Friday, September 21, 2018

Mae West: Obscene Subject

Many great minds have contemplated MAE WEST — — but great minds don’t think alike. Academic and author Chase Dimock has written an interesting article on Mae as a playwright. This is Part 15.
• • Why Don’t You Come Up Sometime and Queer Me? • •
• • Reclaiming Mae West as Author and Sexual Philosopher • •
• • taken interest in such an obscene subject • • 
• • Chase Dimock wrote:  When his sister pushes him on why he has taken interest in such an obscene subject, the Doctor cloaks himself in the rhetoric of the Hippocratic Oath and the objective pursuit of scientific knowledge, “Why every physician owes something to medical science. Old Hippocrates, the Greek founder of medicine himself, did his bit when he formed the school of physicians, and it’s up to the rest of us to do our share.”
• • Chase Dimock wrote:  When his sister questions how such a book could make it through the mail given the censorship of obscene materials, the doctor once again vaguely labels the book “a work of science,” as if the mere mention of scientific inquiry trumps all other pursuits. Often in this era works of fiction, biography, or opinion that directly engaged homosexuality were prefaced with a doctor’s forward assuring that the obscene or offensive subject should be pardoned because the work has value for the medical community in studying a social and psychological problem.
• • a frank discussion • •   . . .
• • His article will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: As It Ought to Be
• • Chase Dimock, who teaches Literature and Composition at College of the Canyons, is Managing Editor of As It Ought to Be.
• • On Friday, 21 September 1934 • •
• • Around 21 September 1934, Mae West was busy promoting her latest release: "Belle of the Nineties."
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • An actress, singer and sex symbol of the early 20th century, Mae West was recognized for her clever humor and bawdy double entendres, as well as for her strong personality as a liberated female.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “I wrote this book about it. It’s called ‘Sex, Health and ESP,’ you know. I eat the right foods, exercise, take care of myself.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • An article in Interview focused on Mae West.
• • Anjelica Huston and Peter Lester wrote:  When talking of the legend that is Mae West, one feels compelled to expound in a sacred language, a language almost as sacred as the rhythm and timbre of speech, a sound that must be unique in this world. She does talk like she sounds in the movies… you know what I mean. Hollywood Boulevard, still dry from the heat of summer, seemed gray and bland; a complete contrast to the apprehension we felt in our stomachs as we drove to interview one of the most innovative stars the screen has ever known. Miss West had specifically requested no tape recorder. ...
• • Source: Interview Magazine; published in December 1974 issue
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • • 
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — — 
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 14th anniversary • •  
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fourteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,000 blog posts. Wow!  
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fourteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4048th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml   

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in a cartoon from 1934

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Mae West: Gay Biology

Many great minds have contemplated MAE WEST — — but great minds don’t think alike. Academic and author Chase Dimock has written an interesting article on Mae as a playwright. This is Part 14.
• • Why Don’t You Come Up Sometime and Queer Me? • •
• • Reclaiming Mae West as Author and Sexual Philosopher • •
• • Havelock Ellis, Richard Von Krafft Ebbing, or Freud • •
• • Chase Dimock wrote:  What I find interesting about the reference to Ulrichs is that Mae West could have used more famous sexologists like Havelock Ellis, Richard Von Krafft Ebbing, or even the contemporary Freud to establish interest in the biology and psychology of homosexuality. Instead, she picked a more obscure name that was not so much interested in proving the biology of homosexuality as he was in taking it as an a priori fact and using the language to campaign for civil rights.
• • sympathetic to the homosexual • •
• • Chase Dimock wrote:  The Doctor is thus immediately established as sympathetic to the homosexual. Explaining his interest in the text to his sister, the Doctor states “there are many, man ills that science has not yet discovered, Barbara, to say nothing of being able to cure them.”
• • taken interest in such an obscene subject • •  . . .
• • His article will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: As It Ought to Be
• • Chase Dimock, who teaches Literature and Composition at College of the Canyons, is Managing Editor of As It Ought to Be.
• • On Monday, 20 September 2010 in The Yale Review • •
• • “Mae West” • •
• • James McCourt wrote: One evening in the late 1970s, the last decade in which she made her living, Mae West, less and less often present ringside in downtown Los Angeles, more and more at home in her sumptuous white suite In the Ravenswood Apartments on Rossmore Avenue in Hollywood, told of a visitor she’d been entertaining at her leisure, at regular intervals in between reading and revising her memoirs.
• • Mae West said: Here I was, sittin’ on my big white couch and who should come to see me, all in evenin’ clothes, but Lou — — gone ovah, y’know, some years ago.  …”
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae is now working on her new contract by the terms of which she gets $100,000 a picture. They also say that the curvaceous one also gets about half that amount again for providing her own story and, be it known, Mae won't stand for anybody's writing stories for her pictures but Mae.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  “TV means too many people seein’ you for nothing.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A book on film stars mentioned Mae West.
• • Richard Irvin wrote:  And so who is Ms. Lyons? Dahl Lee Lyons appears to be the pen name of Dolly Lyons Dempsey, a longtime fan of Mae West's and the first president of her fan club. …
• • Source: Film Stars’ Television Projects: Pilots and Series of 50+ Movie Greats, 1948; published in 2017
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • • 
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — — 
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 14th anniversary • •  
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fourteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,000 blog posts. Wow!  
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fourteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4047th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml   

• • Photo:
• • Mae West •  in 1970

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West