Thursday, February 20, 2020

Mae West: Penetrative Insight

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 8 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Mae West’s mentality is a fine blending • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: As a matter of fact, you are the type who would rather wear out than rust out. We don’t blame you.
• • Everything about your writing points to a superior intellect — — shrewd and astute with a quick penetrative insight into human nature. Your mentality is a fine blending of logic and intuition, of deductive reasoning and crystal-clear discernment.
• • Alert observation and a retentive memory are denoted. You remember scads of things which others never notice in the first place.
• • You are clever, nimble-witted, and quick on the trigger. What could be a better illustration of that than the stories, lines, dialogue which you write for yourself? . . . Whoops m'dear. ...
• • Zita cannot overlook Mae’s faults • • . . .
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Friday, 20 February 1998 in Seattle • •
• • "Sex" written by Mae West and directed by Ed Hawkins was onstage in Washington. It was performed at Annex Theatre, 1916 Fourth Ave., Seattle, WA.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West portrayed an evangelist in Nome, Alaska in her film "Klondike Annie" — — released in February 1936 after a lengthy hold-up by the censors who refused to let Mae West appear as a preacher or religious worker onscreen. 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I never expected to be sent to jail."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • Simon Doonan's interview mentioned Mae West.
• • "My Night with Raquel" • •
• • Simon Doonan wrote: According to Raquel Welch, Mae West had only one speed. It mattered not whether the cameras were whirring. Her entire life was spent mincing about in circles and dispensing those double-entendres in that voice. ...
• • Source: Slate; posted on Thursday, 16 February 2012
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,414th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's handwriting in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Mae West: Zita's Warning

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 7 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Zita gives Mae a warning • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: However, you are much too aspiring, too intense and highly-strung to be able to concentrate on humdrum or monotonous routine.
• • Enthusiasm is a keynote to your nature. If you do a thing at all, you throw yourself into it, heart and soul. There is nothing half-hearted about you. You tackle your undertakings with spirit and enterprise.
• • A Warning from Zita Lomas • • 
• • Right here, we are going to give you a warning. You must beware of burning yourself out by your own intensity. It is fortunate for you with your temperament, that you possess vitality, endurance and recuperative capacity which your confident strokes, firm tracing and ascendant writing show.
• • Mae’s mentality is a fine blending • • . . .
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Monday, 19 February 1940 in Life Magazine • •
• • The cover of Life Magazine's issue dated for 19 February 1940 featured the King of Romania. Inside were two aristocrats of comedy: Mae West and W.C. Fields.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • One of his earliest minor movie credits was an appearance in a vehicle that brought Mae West to Hollywood. Louis Calhern played Dick Bolton in "Night After Night." Calhern had but a single scene in this picture.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “When it comes to finances, remember that there are no withholding taxes on the wages of sin.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • An Australian newspaper mentioned Mae West.
• • "Mae West Sick" • •
• • New York, February 17 [A.A.P.]— Mae West collapsed on the stage at Rochester last night, but the show went on. She was unable to continue with the third act of the play, 'Diamond Lil.'  
• • It was presented without her.  …
• • Source: Page 1 of The Courier-Mail (Brisbane); published on Saturday, 18 February 1950
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,413th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's handwriting was analyzed in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Mae West: Inflated Loops

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 6 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • What Mae’s capital letters show • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: You aim high and would never rest content with mediocrity.
• • Zita Lomas added: Those capitals show self-reliance and independence of thought, too. The large inflated loops in the M and W of your signature reveal tremendous personal pride, and also a love of money and the good things of life from a materialistic standpoint.
• • A combination of ambition, concentration and astuteness, carried you to your present pinnacle.
• • The fact that your writing, apart from the capitals, is fairly small means that you are able to concentrate — — to keep all your energies in one channel, to hold a definite and specific goal in mind, and strive for direct results.
• • Zita gives Mae a warning • • . . .
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Saturday, 18 February 1933 in The New Yorker • •
• • An article about Mae West and her new film "She Done Him Wrong" was printed in The New Yorker in their issue dated for Saturday, 18 February 1933.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West starred in the motion pictures "Go West Young Man" [1936] and "Every Day's a Holiday" [1937] and the film editing was done by Raymond Frank Curtiss who was born in California in the month of February.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I may be a bad woman but I'm a good actress."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • An article on shame and disgrace mentioned Mae West.
• • Marina Hyde wrote: The idea of disgrace being a career opportunity is not especially new. "I expect it will be the making of me," Mae West purred in 1927 of her arrest on vice charges relating to her play Sex, and indeed it was. But it has never been easier to bounce back, and TV is the primary redemptive force. ...
• • Source: The Guardian [UK]; posted on Friday, 16 February 2007
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,412th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's handwritten contract with Howard Merling in 1931 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Monday, February 17, 2020

Mae West: Priestess of Sex

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 5 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • the high priestess of sex • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: But even if we never heard anything about you, except that you are the high priestess of sex, an expert in the portrayal of lusty and sinful ladies, we'd know from your handwriting that you are sloshing over with affection, sympathy, and generosity. Didn't you send us your handwriting sample when we wrote and asked you for it? . . . Immediately and without a whimper, too. . . .
• • Of course, we can’t prove the last point, but we'd bet our fortune on it if we had a fortune. By the look of your handwriting, we doubt very much if you ever whimpered to your life.
• • Concentration • •
• • Those exceedingly high capitals reveal your ambitious, aspiring nature — — your intense desire to shine, to be prominent, to excel in everything you go in for.
• • What Mae’s capital letters show • •  . . .
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Monday, 17 February 2003 in Florida • •
• • Reporting on an upcoming Gem and Jewelry Show in Fort Lauderdale on Monday, 17 February 2003, The Sun-Sentinel wrote that pieces owned by Mae West would be on display and available for purchase.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •

• • With shock-proof punches but with haymakers nevertheless, Mae West uncorks a flashy, melodramatic entertainment of the 1890s in "Belle of the Nineties," trippingly gay and gaudy for the most part but lingering in spots. 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "In my pictures I never took a man from another woman or pursued another woman's husband. That was all part of my plan to keep women audiences happy.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A trade paper mentioned Mae West.
• • Variety's reporter "Bige" wrote: Mae West in pictures should stand out as she did in legit — —  as a distinct personality ...
• • Source: Variety; published on Tuesday, 14 February 1933
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,411th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's autograph for Noel, a British fan  • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Friday, February 14, 2020

Mae West: Up-turned Finals

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 4 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Mae’s open a’s and o’s are very significant • •
• • Zita Lomas wrote: It is that ardor which imparts so much warmth to your personality, a warmth which draws people to you and inspires their confidence.
• • Magnanimous • • 
• • Those open a’s and o’s are very significant. They indicate a sympathetic, generous-hearted nature. The many up-turned finals and the wide spacing enhance this indication.
• • There is nothing that you wouldn't do, Mae West, to help a fellow out. We remember reading things about your magnanimous gestures and charitable Impulses.
• • the high priestess of sex • •  . . . 
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Tuesday, 14 February 1933 • •
• • Variety's reporter "Bige" wrote an article on "She Done Him Wrong." The magazine ran it on pages 12 and 21 in their issue dated 14 February 1933.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West has as many taboos as she has curves. She doesn't like black cats, the numbers thirteen or twenty-three, and wouldn't walk under a ladder on a bet. But her greatest fear was unconsciously revealed one day by her when she told a mutual friend, "The thing that worries me most, young fella, is the reformers likin' me. When they do I'll know I'm slippin'!"
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "It wasn't what I did, but how I did it. Well, everybody knows how I did it. I've got more imitators than anyone else, so they know. A lot of gay boys imitate me." 
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • The Watertown Daily Times mentioned Mae West.
• • Mae West Lures "Mr. Ed" To Equine Dream House • •
• • "I've vamped a lot of males in my time," purred the 72-year-old veteran of stage, screen, and night clubs, "but this is the first time they've asked me to charm a horse!" . . .
• • Source: The Watertown Daily Times; published on Friday, 14 February 1964
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,410th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's longhand note to Zita Lomas • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Mae West: Kindly Curves

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 3 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • In every line and stroke, your writing shows • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: You get an inner satisfaction out of surmounting difficulties and overcoming opposition. But your ways are not hard and ruthless. As often as not, you achieve your ends and gain your points by a subtly diplomatic element which lies close to your surface of disarming frankness and candor.
Mae West wrote this in 1939
• • In every line and stroke, your writing shows ability to deal with people and to handle situations.
• • We are glad to see those kindly curves in your angular handwriting. They show that you possess attributes of tenderness and gentleness, too. And the pronounced slope reflects a wealth of affection and emotionalism in your nature.
• • Mae’s open a’s and o’s are very significant • •  . . .  
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Saturday, 13 February 1971 • •
• • Mae West was the cover girl on Nieuwe Revu (in the Netherlands), a magazine dated for Saturday, 13 February 1971, Issue # 8.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West has bought a six-acre ranch out Van Nuys way that has ten room and a guest house. She claims it is difficult to find peace and quietness in an apartment, but wait until her friends hear about that guest house on the ranch. 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “Good girls go to heaven, bad girls go everywhere.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • The Pottstown Mercury (Pottstown, PA) mentioned Mae West.
• • Mae West had numerous things to say about politics.
• • "Of course,” said the comedienne, with a wide grin, "there may be one drawback to a government controlled by women. The State Department might have to fold up and international diplomacy might just as easily collapse. For how many women can keep a secret?” . . .
• • Source: Pottstown Mercury; published on Monday, 10 February 1936
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,409th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's longhand sample in 1939 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Mae West: Zip and Zest

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 2 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Mae West’s penmanship • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: What we do mean is that your writing has a dashing look, an appearance of pep and zip and zest — — the qualities which characterize your own arresting personality.
• • We are going to take your handwriting and tear it apart, feature by feature.
• • We said before that it was a primarily angular script. The fact that you find this pen expression tells us that you are an active and energetic individual, with an innate aversion to ease, indolence and idleness.
• • That angularity, combined with the obvious rapidity of execution, the firm, clear tracing and ascendant base line, reveals your confident, forceful, decisive aggressiveness. It is the reflection of a naturally enterprising go-getter — — one who always looks up and ahead, never down and backwards.
• • In every line and stroke, your writing shows • •  …
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Friday, 12 February 1943 • •
• • This is a letter Mae West wrote on Friday, 12 February 1943.
• • Dear Mr. Jackson-Craig:
• • No one could help being moved by your always beautiful letters and the fineness of the sentiment they express. The most recent of your letters presents a problem, however, that cannot, I am afraid, be solved in the way that you wish. ... A life such as mine is anything but simple. ...
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Shame! I find no fault with the nominations except they did not include that sturdiest, acting-est American, Mae West.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "Personality is the most important thing to an actress’s success."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • An article on Richmond Hill (Queens, NY) mentioned Mae West, who was a smoker when she lived there.
• • Jane Gross wrote: The Triangle Hofbrau is legendary.
• • Jane Gross wrote: Originally a rest stop for Long Island farmers on the way to Brooklyn, it housed Richmond Hill's first country store and post office and was the headquarters for George Bilofers, a police officer who rode a bicycle patrol from Jamaica to the Rockaways.
• • Jane Gross wrote: Mae West dined there regularly, despite the fact that Emil Four's mother would not let her smoke.  . . .
• • Note: In 1919, the place was sold to Mr. Four. His wife, formerly Ernestine Schuh, bore him sons Emil Jr., Ernest and Charles, along with daughters Caroline and Anna. Mrs. Ernestine Four was the matron who would ask Mae West to put out her cigarette. But, like most smokers, Mae resisted.  . . .
• • Source: The N.Y. Times; published on Saturday, 6 April 1985
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,408th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's longhand sample in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Mae West: Curvy Longhand

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 1 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Zita Lomas wrote: Dear Mae: We are not going to address you formally as Miss West, because you are not the type of person who inspires formality. We think of you as the breezy, real pal sort — — friendly, cordial, and dripping with good humor and kindly feelings towards humanity.
Mae's handwriting in 1910
• • And now that we have seen your handwriting, we don't merely THINK you are like that. We KNOW you are.
• • Because we are a graphologist, one of our pet theories is that people's handwritings "look just like them.”
• • Now your writing is a primarily angular script, lightly traced wit, kindly rounded curves. So when we say that it looks just like you, we don't mean it in a literal sense. We know perfectly well that you are al! curves, that you have made the world curve-conscious, and that it was you who inspired the new word ''curvaceous."
• • Mae West’s penmanship • • . . .
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • John Edwin West, Jr. [11 February 1900 — 12 October 1964] • •
• • Born in February — — on Sunday, 11 February 1900 — — in Brooklyn, John Edwin West died on 12 October 1964. He was 64. Mae made arrangements for the body of her beloved kid brother to be sent back to Brooklyn to the family crypt.
• • Two weeks later, Mae — — who hated to think about death — — made a Will.
• • On Friday, 11 February 1977 in Bookviews • •
• • Mae West said: "Hiring someone to write your autobiography is like hiring someone to take a bath for you." Mae's comment was quoted in Bookviews, on 11 February 1977.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • "Belle of the Nineties," the Mae West picture revamped under the strengthened Production Code Administration, has been passed by the New York censor board without a deletion, declared Paramount yesterday. It is set for a September release.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • About Owney Madden, Mae West said: "Hmmm, he was cruel but he could be sweet."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • An article on curves and feminine beauty in the cinema mentioned Mae West.
• • "Mae West, Tivoli Theatre" • •
• • The Courier-Mail editors wrote this: Although she has given the world of women back curves and removed some feminine angles, Mae West is not fat. She weighs but 119 1b. She believes in being nicely rounded.
• • Because of her versatility and charm in presenting comedy, Mae West became internationally famous in "She Done Him Wrong," which introduced Mae West to the world. She turned out most of the dialogue, wrote the lyrics for the original musical score, and aided the designing of the wardrobe as well. "She Done Him Wrong," which will come to the Tivoli Theatre next Friday, presents Mae West to Brisbane in her first starring picture. Her wit and originality have made it popular. ...
• • Source: The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Queensland); published on Wednesday, 7 February 1934
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,407th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's longhand sample in 1910 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Monday, February 10, 2020

Mae West: Zita Lomas

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas.
• • Broadcast Weekly gave its readers a little of the low-down on the exotically attractive Vancouver-based columnist who had been dissecting the handwritings of radio personalities.
• • Broadcast Weekly wrote: Zita Lomas, who looks Latin or Russian, is a Canadian of Irish descent. She hates cold weather and is never seen without earrings.
• • Broadcast Weekly wrote: As a result of conducting a newspaper publicity campaign for Warner Brothers — First National Pictures, Lomas received letters from many well-known film celebrities. Among her collection are notes from such famous stars (William Powell, Kay Francis, et al). What started the cinematic ball rolling, however, was a letter from, and her article about Mae West, of the Paramount Studios.
• • On Friday, 29 December 1933, The Vancouver Sun wrote: Mae West, the celebrated movie star wrote to Zita Lomas, The Sun's graphologist, who bared Mae West's good and bad point (Ignoring the "curves") in the tabloid magazine section of this week's Sunday Sun.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” will begin tomorrow.
• • On Tuesday, 10 February 2009 • •
• • A book about Mae West "She Always Knew How: Mae West, A Personal Biography" by Charlotte Chandler was published in a hardcover edition (336 pages) by Simon and Schuster on 10 February 2009.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West, whose nasally provocative delivery, eye-rolling, lip-pursing, and pelvic tics parody the conventional invitation of flirtation, is never out of control and is Camp, pure and simple.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I'm still looking for the right man. My trouble is, I find so many right ones, it's hard to decide."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • The Motion Picture Daily mentioned Mae West.
• • Motion Picture wrote: Schaefer verified reports that the new title of the Mae West picture would not be "That St. Louis Woman," as indicated earlier on the coast.
• • Motion Picture wrote: Screencraft Prod, has already completed a picture using that title and will release it soon. The new Mae West picture will be re-titled and released as soon as remakes now in progress have been completed, it was stated. …
• • Source: Motion Picture Daily; published on Tuesday, 3 July 1934
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,406th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
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• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Zita in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Friday, February 07, 2020

Mae West: Belle of Nowhere

Did the movie queen MAE WEST possess the power to alter the reputation of New Orleans? Listen to their very concerned citizens and club-women discuss their personal feelings about the controversial Brooklyn bombshell and "Belle of New Orleans," Paramount’s potential movie title.
• • “New Orleans Is Agitated” • •
• • New Orleans, July 11 — This fair home of the Sazerac, suh, is worried about its reputation. More, it's agitated.
• • Motion Picture wrote: Somebody suggested that calling Mae West's new opus "Belle of New Orleans" would — er — ah — would convey the wrong impression. The suggestion swelled into a chorus, and now everybody except Huey Long is talking — or telegramming.
• • Motion Picture wrote: First it was the Association of Commerce, then it was the Kiwanis Club, now it's the Federation of Women's Clubs and the Better Films Council. Mayor T. Semmes Walmsley has joined those who are sending telegrams to Will H. Hays.
• • Motion Picture wrote: J. K. Byrne had the Kiwanis Club pass a resolution saying the title "Belle of New Orleans" would give a "false impression" of New Orleans.
• • Motion Picture wrote: Frank Martin of Kiwanis objected and said the title would be good advertising for the city and would bring tourists to a liberal city without blue laws, but he was greeted with raised eyebrows and just a trace of pained surprise.
• • Motion Picture wrote: Mrs. Isabel Giefers, president of the women's federation; Mrs. A. S. Tucker, president of the Better Films Council, and Mrs. Bettina Gunczy, secretary of the National Board of Review, were among those who wired Will Hays about Mae West.
• • Motion Picture wrote: It's the biggest disturbance since the last time the levee broke and flooded St. Louis and Basin Streets.
• • Source: Motion Picture Daily; published on Thursday, 12 July 1934.
• • On Tuesday, 7 February 1933 • •
• • It was on Tuesday, 7 February 1933, that Mae recorded "A Guy What Takes His Time" (one of her saucy hits from "She Done Him Wrong") for Brunswick Records.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Paramount is bringing you 6 new pictures, starting with the year's greatest money attraction, Mae West in "It Ain't No Sin” and a great musical, “Shoot the Works." 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “I’m no model lady.  A model’s just an imitation of the real thing.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • The Motion Picture Daily mentioned Mae West.
• • Mae West Film Not Banned • •
• • Columbus, July 4. — Published reports emanating from here that Mae West's new picture, formerly titled "It Ain't No Sin," had been banned by the Ohio censor board have been denied by Dr. B. O. Skinner, head of the board.
• • "The Mae West picture was never presented to the censor board of Ohio," Dr. Skinner wired John Hammel at the Paramount home office. …
• • Source: Motion Picture Daily; published on Thursday, 5 July 1934
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,405th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
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• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • in 1934 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Thursday, February 06, 2020

Mae West: Re-makes Delayed

Box-office draw MAE WEST was often in the headlines. Controversy was always swirling around the latest “Mae West picture.” Battling for industry dominance during the Great Depression, Paramount and 20th Century Fox were key players in this drama. Only one studio had exclusive access, however, to Mae.
• • Paramount — Capitol Pool Deal Awaits Action • •
• • Motion Picture wrote: Pooling of the Capitol and Paramount remained in status quo yesterday as representatives of both Loew's and Paramount prepared for further conferences on the proposal in the near future.
• • Motion Picture wrote: The outcome of the Loew-Warner negotiations for the Fox Metropolitan circuit and final release of Paramount's new Mae West picture are reported to have a bearing on the current delay.
• • Motion Picture wrote: Though denied, reports persist that if the Loew-Warner bid for Fox Met is consummated, all Warner Broadway houses would be turned over to Loew's, in which event the Capitol-Paramount pool probably would be abandoned.
• • The Mae West picture — — Re-makes have delayed its release • •
• • Motion Picture wrote: The Mae West picture was slated to be the first to play the Capitol under the pooling arrangement. Re-makes have delayed its release and no outstanding picture is available to take its place as the first booking on the Capitol's non-stage show policy, which would become effective with the pooling.
• • Source: Motion Picture Daily (page 1 news); published on Tuesday, 3 July 1934.
• • On Monday, 6 February 1928 • •
• • Mae West mailed her manuscript for "Diamond Lil" to the Library of Congress from the Harding Hotel, West 54th Street, New York, NY. The date of her Washington, DC copyright registration is Monday, 6 February 1928. The play opened on Broadway in April 1928.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Indicating Paramount's anticipation that the Mae West film will be dry cleaned sufficiently for release in the fall is a September date set aside for the picture at the Paramount here.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I'm much too busy to worry about gossip and trivial matters. If they don't like me, that's their business. I gotta keep busy turning out good pictures. Now that — — that's my business."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • The Motion Picture Daily mentioned Mae West.
• • “Out on Sunday” • •
• • Kansas City, Sept. 13. — As a concession to something or other, the Kansas City Journal-Post, running a serialized feature by Mae West titled "Me and My Past," omitted the story on Sunday and carried the installment on Monday instead.
• • An editor's note said the arrangement was requested by La West. …
• • Source: Motion Picture Daily; published on Friday, 14 September 1934
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,404th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
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• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • news in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Wednesday, February 05, 2020

Mae West: Sleazy Sexuality

In case you missed a fascinating review of a book analyzing MAE WEST, here it is. This is Part 6 of 6 parts.
• • “Mae West, Diamond in the Rough” • •
• • Mae West became a camp icon • •
• • Gerald Weales wrote: After that, she turned into a camp icon and occasionally tried to rediscover her audience onstage, in nightclubs and in the final pathetic [sic] films she made in the 1970s.
• • Gerald Weales wrote: Hamilton traces this arc of West's professional life, stopping often to produce mini-essays on urban life at the turn of the century, on changing sexual mores, on sleazy and genteel vaudeville, on the economic and artistic politics of Broadway and Hollywood, on the changing image of the Bowery, on the real and the mythical Harlem, on the homosexual subculture of New York in the 1920s, on whatever social phenomenon she sees as contributing to or obstructing West's career. Much of the material is familiar and Hamilton repeats herself too often, but on the whole the book is an effective combination of social and theatrical history.
• • Note: The reviewer wrote about "She Done Him Wrong" in "Canned Good as Caviar," his book on American film comedy in the 1930s.
• • This book review by Gerald Weales has been concluded with this segment, which is Part 6. Hope you enjoyed it.
• • Source: The Washington Post; published on Thursday, 11 January 1996.
On Monday, 5 February 1934 in Scandinavia • •
• • "I'm No Angel" starring Mae West made its debut in Denmark on 5 February 1934.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Outstanding has been the Mae West picture. In second place, probably, was "Madame Du Barry," which Warners now anticipate releasing in a few weeks.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I'll never do the smart thing because it is smart. For instance, I won't go to the opera. It's all right for people who honestly love it, but a certain percentage goes just to be seen. Personally, I'd rather watch prize-fights, and I do."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • The Motion Picture Daily mentioned Mae West.
• • We want our critics to see the list of enduring favorites that are to be made into films.
• • We are laying little stress on the Mae West pictures, the Gables, the Crawfords, the Rogerses because we know that the admirers of these stars will come out as usual, but we are stressing the pictures made from popular books because we know that is the best and most positive way to answer our critics, and at the same time reach that large group of folks who only rarely attend our theatres. …
• • Source: Motion Picture Daily; published on Saturday, 1 September 1934
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,403rd blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • backstage at the Royale Theatre in 1928 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest