Friday, February 28, 2020

Mae West: Torso Tossing

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 14 of 14 segments, the grand finale.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • we’ll close by answering your question, Mae West • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: So we'll close by answering the question in your letter. You're doin’ great, Mae. Your pictures come back, over and over again, for repeat showings — — and how you line ‘em up at the box office. 
• • Here's to you and your "lurid lady" screen type.
• • Give us plenty of torso-tossing, hip-swivelling, and upholstered wickedness. We love it. Be torrid, horrid, fast, and naughty — — it stirs up our dormant caveman instincts. 
• • We admire your courageous nerve and honesty in playing lurid ladies, and in exploiting curves and luscious contours. You're the best public health officer in the world today.
• • Zita Lomas wrote: We think you're grand.  Good luck, and thanks for the note. 
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas has now been concluded with this post.
• • Note: Many thanks to writer and researcher Mark Desjardins for securing a hard copy of this 1933 article from his secret sources.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Tuesday, 28 February 1933 • •
• • An article on Mae's staying power — — "Paramount's Unusual 3rd Week for Mae West" — — was printed in Variety on Tuesday, 28 February 1933.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • The Hollywood Reporter ran an article: "Mae West Captures Paris Fans."
• • They wrote: Mae West has taken Paris like the revolutionists took the Bastille. "I'm No Angel" is packing them in at Gaumont-Elysee, with long lines being turned away daily.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “I'm much too busy to worry about the censor boards. ... If they don’t like me, well, that’s their business. In 'I'm No Angel' only one line was deleted by the censors, and that’s my business."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • Spiked mentioned Mae West.
• • Matthew Albas wrote: ‘I believe in censorship. I made a fortune out of it.’ It is a shame these words, spoken by Hollywood actress Mae West, are not more widely known.
• • Matthew Albas wrote: Mae West, whose risqué double entendres were often targeted for censorship, knew more than anyone that people would always be more tempted to seek out material that others had tried to suppress. Sometimes scandal sells more than positive press. . . .
• • Source: Spiked; published on Friday, 21 February 2020
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,420th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Mae West: New Numerologising

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 13 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Mae’s extravagant tastes revealed in her penmanship • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: The arrangement of your letter on the front page of this section, reflects your exacting sense of form, balance, and proportion, and the wide spacing shows your extravagant tastes and love of luxury, elegance, and grandeur.
• • Mae Is Doin’ Great • •  
• • We could tell you a lot more things if we had the space. In fact, we could finish with the graphology, and then start numerologising your name and birthdate, and go on and on indefinitely.
• • But we're already afraid that our Editor is going to toss a conniption when he sees the length of this.
• • we’ll close by answering your question, Mae West • • ...
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be concluded on the very next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • Happy Birthday, Mark! • • 
Mark Desjardins
• • Happy Birthday to Mae-maven and Canadian researcher R. Mark Desjardins. He was born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on Tuesday, 27 February 1951.
• • Readers have noticed the fascinating excerpts we have posted from time to time, with his kind permission, from his manuscript "In Search of Mae West," a carefully detailed magnum opus that will be released as soon as it's completed.
• • Mark reviewed the autobiography of Guido Roberto Deiro, the step-son of Mae West, in August 2019 for The Mae West Blog.
• • Here he is, handsomely posed in Hollywood surrounded by carefully preserved Mae memorabilia.
• • Enjoy your special day, Mark!
• • On Thursday, 27 February 1936 • •
• • Joseph Breen wrote to Will Hays about Mae West and "KIondike Annie." His letter is dated for Thursday, 27 February 1936.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Asserting that right is might, Frank Wallace today renewed his efforts to obtain a court order declaring him to be the husband of Mae West, motion picture star. 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "Come up and sue me some time.''
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A gay magazine mentioned Mae West.
• • “Dinah East” • •
"Dinah East" film poster
• • Katrina C. Rose wrote: At the time, one thing that everyone tried to dance around was the obvious: the movie was a thinly veiled exposition upon the rumor that a certain directionally-surnamed film star of the 1930s was actually a man — — Mae West. In the early 1970s, unlike the character of Dinah East, Mae West was still very much alive and still very capable of filing legal cease-and-desist letters and defamation actions.
• • Katrina C. Rose wrote: Whether or not Mae West was anything other than an over-the-hill sex-monger is subjective, but any suggestion that the made-up name “Dinah East” was not a play on the famous Hollywood icon Mae West is laughable. . . .
• • Source: LGBTQ Nation; published on Saturday, 1 February 2020
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,419th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mark Desjardins and "Dinah East" • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Mae West: Dynamic Energy

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 12 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Mae West’s dynamic energy • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: And in the second place, your writing reveals a pronounced flair for scientific and technical matters. You possess a strong investigating instinct, and real inventive ability along technical and scientific lines.
Mae West autographed her novel for a fan
• • A busy and active life is essential to your temperament. Your dynamic energy must have an outlet.  
• • There are any number of things which you could have gone in for successfully. For instance, you would make a humdinger of a lawyer, politician or doctor, advertising manager, or business and show promoter — — vocations not usually in the realm of women.
• • And, Mae, it's clear you would make just the zippiest newspaper columnist imaginable with your wit and with a breezy, impersonally personal style of pungent satire.
• • Mae’s extravagance revealed in her penmanship • • ... 
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Wednesday, 26 February 1936 • •
• • Hollywood Citizen News ran this article on Wednesday, 26 February 1936: "Mae West Mum in Lubitsch, Timony Debate."
• • Finale on Saturday, 26 February 1949 • •
• • A revival of "Diamond Lil" opened at the Coronet Theatre in February [5 February 1949 — 26 February 1949] on Broadway.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Production on "Myra Breckinridge" began on 23 September 1969 and concluded on 26 February 1970. 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I'll never try to go sweet and simple in the movies."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A book on censorship mentioned Mae West.
• • John Houchin wrote: As Marybeth Hamilton has pointed out, the “dirty play controversy” was as much about the struggle for control of Broadway as it was about the division between “prudes and progressives.” It was fought out among three groups – moral reformers, progressives, and Mae West’s “wise cracking” fans — — all of which sought to control who wrote, produced, and viewed Broadway plays. …
• • Source: Censorship of the American Theatre in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press; 1st edition); published on Thursday, 9 April 2009
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,418th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's hand-signed page in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Mae West: An Extravert

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 11 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • So much for faults and shortcomings • • 
• • An Extravert • •  
• • Zita Lomas wrote: You are what the psychologists call an extravert. You deal with everything in an objective, rather than a subjective way, because you are more concerned with concrete facts and realities than you are with abstractions and theories. In other words, you are a doer rather than a dreamer, a person of action rather than of meditation.
• • a perfect whizz of an aviatrix • •
• • Zita Lomas wrote: And speaking of action, do you know that you would wake a perfect whizz of an aviatrix? What makes us think so? Well, in the first place, you love an active life, travel, variety, excitement and adventure.
• • Mae West’s dynamic energy • • . . .
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Tuesday, 25 February 1913 • •
• • The announcement that "Mae West, the comedienne" was appearing at the Grand ran in the Atlantic Journal on Tuesday, 25 February 1913.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Popular Hollywood actors and actresses like Charlie Chaplin and Mae West had drinks named in their honor. The Mae West cocktail contains brandy, half an egg yolk, sugar, and cayenne pepper. 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I will probably write a new play based on my experiences here. It will have to be okayed by the learned district attorney before I can put it on."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • An article about the Oscar ceremonies mentioned Mae West.
• • "Five of the biggest Oscar night controversies" • •
• • TheJournal.ie wrote: Rock Hudson and Mae West caused a stir with their ‘kingsize’ rendition of the song "Baby It’s Cold Outside" at the 1957 awards show. ...
• • Source: TheJournal.ie; published on Sunday, 26 February 2012
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,417th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's graphologist Zita Lomas in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Monday, February 24, 2020

Mae West: Highly-Strung

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 10 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Faults and a highly-strung temperament • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: You must keep a tight rein on this quality, and learn to keep it subservient to that diplomatic element which we mentioned . . . somewhere back there.
In 1935 Mae West was practising her autograph
• • While on the subject of your faults, we advise you to guard against such traits as impatience, quick temper and irritability. Those attributes are allied to your intense, enthusiastic and highly-strung temperament.
• • And one more thing, Mae, don't let your great love of money and material wealth become a dominating passion with you.
• • So much for Mae West's faults and shortcomings. ... • •
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Saturday, 24 February 1945 • •
• • Archives of the National Theatre in D.C. mentioned that Mae West performed there.
• • From Monday, 19 February 1945 through Saturday, 24 February 1945 "Catherine Was Great" was onstage there. This comedy by and starring Mae West had billed the star in their Program as "Diamond Lil of all Russia.” Mae brought "Come On Up" to this venue on 23 September 1946 for a week-long engagement.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Starring Mae West, the motion picture "Klondike Annie" was in movie houses across the USA for the President's Day weekend.
• • The motion picture was released at a production cost of $1,000,000.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I'm all dignity."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A California daily mentioned Mae West.
• • “Voiler, Wanted in Mae West Robbery, Is Jailed in Miami” • •
• • Los Angeles — Feb 21 — AP — District Attorney Buron Fitts said he was advised of the arrest to-day in Miami, Florida of Harry Voiler, alleged "inside man" in the robbery of Mae West, screen actress.
• • Voiler was indicted on charges of conspiracy to rob Mae West, but resisted extradition from Illinois. Buron Fitts explained that Harry Voiler was apprehended as he attempted to flee for Cuba. ...
• • Source: The Modesto Bee; published on Wednesday, 21 February 1934
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,416th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's handwritten scribbling in 1935 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Friday, February 21, 2020

Mae West: Sprinkle Sugar

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 9 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Zita Lomas cannot overlook Mae West’s faults • •  
• • Zita Lomas wrote: Now Mae, we have been telling you a lot of nice things, and we have plenty yet to come, but we don't intend to overlook your faults. We never lather people with soft soap, sprinkle them with sugar and spread on the salve.
• • Candid • •  
• • Like you, we were born under the zodiac sign of Leo, and it makes us frank, candid, and direct. So, without beating around the bush, we say that you can be horribly cutting and sarcastic at times. We can see this in those tapering bars, coupled as they are with many sharp and pointed letter formations.
• • Mae’s faults and her highly-strung temperament • • . . .
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Wednesday, 21 February 1934 • •
• • It was on Wednesday evening, 21 February 1934, when the famed Mae West Jewel Robbery episode was dramatized on "Calling All Cars" over CBS Radio [without her personal participation in this traumatic drama]. Program #13 was sponsored by the Rio Grande Oil Company.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • The headlines read: "Mae West Wins Stage Lawsuit." A happy outcome for Mae but bitter news for Mark Linder, who pursued her not unlike Inspector Javert tailed Jean Valjean.
• • The troubles between Mae and the Linder brothers began in 1928 when "Diamond Lil" was on Broadway the first time.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “Too much make-up ruins kisses.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • An item in Time Magazine mentioned Mae West.
• • Time reporters wrote: Mae West, who has not denied being 56, was still having trouble trying to settle down. "I'm still looking for the right man," she confided to the New York Post's columnist Earl Wilson. "My trouble is, I find so many right ones, it's hard to decide." ...
• • Source: "People" column in Time Magazine; published on Monday, 21 February 1949
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,415th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's handwritten note to Zita, 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Mae West: Penetrative Insight

MAE WEST never learned to type and wrote longhand. Though most of her personal correspondence was typed by a secretary, Mae wrote to a stranger in 1933, Canadian graphologist Zita Lomas. This is Part 8 of 14 segments.
• • “An Open Letter to Mae West” • •
• • Mae West’s mentality is a fine blending • • 
• • Zita Lomas wrote: As a matter of fact, you are the type who would rather wear out than rust out. We don’t blame you.
• • Everything about your writing points to a superior intellect — — shrewd and astute with a quick penetrative insight into human nature. Your mentality is a fine blending of logic and intuition, of deductive reasoning and crystal-clear discernment.
• • Alert observation and a retentive memory are denoted. You remember scads of things which others never notice in the first place.
• • You are clever, nimble-witted, and quick on the trigger. What could be a better illustration of that than the stories, lines, dialogue which you write for yourself? . . . Whoops m'dear. ...
• • Zita cannot overlook Mae’s faults • • . . .
• • This very long article by Zita Lomas will be continued on the next post.
• • Source: The Vancouver Sun (page 4); published on Saturday, 30 December 1933.
• • On Friday, 20 February 1998 in Seattle • •
• • "Sex" written by Mae West and directed by Ed Hawkins was onstage in Washington. It was performed at Annex Theatre, 1916 Fourth Ave., Seattle, WA.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West portrayed an evangelist in Nome, Alaska in her film "Klondike Annie" — — released in February 1936 after a lengthy hold-up by the censors who refused to let Mae West appear as a preacher or religious worker onscreen. 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I never expected to be sent to jail."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • Simon Doonan's interview mentioned Mae West.
• • "My Night with Raquel" • •
• • Simon Doonan wrote: According to Raquel Welch, Mae West had only one speed. It mattered not whether the cameras were whirring. Her entire life was spent mincing about in circles and dispensing those double-entendres in that voice. ...
• • Source: Slate; posted on Thursday, 16 February 2012
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,414th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • Mae's handwriting in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest