Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Mae West: Value of Gems

On Thursday, 16 July 1936 Associated Press discussed jewelry owned by MAE WEST and other major players in Hollywood.
• • “Harold Lloyd Leads All Filmland as Value of Jewels Told” • • 
• • By Walter B. Clausen (Associated Press Writer)
• • HOLLYWOOD, July 15. A man lists the most valuable jewels among Hollywood's movie stars. Harold Lloyd is the man. Norma Shearer admits first place with jewels among actresses.
• • Charles Chaplin is the wealthiest star. Mary Pickford is the wealthiest actress.
• • Joan Crawford ranks next to Norma Shearer with jewels. Both Tom Mix and Joe E. Brown have more jewelry than Diamond Lil — — Mae West.
• • These are some of the facts written into the year's records of the county tax collector. . . .
• • Jewelry assessments on the tax list include Harold Lloyd $30,000, Norma Shearer $11,800, Joan Crawford $10,000, Tom Mix, $7,500, Joe E. Brown $5,000, Constance Bennett $3,500, Mae West $3,500.
• • Mae West retains her figure the same as last year, $4,600 of which $3,500 is jewels.
• • Source: Item on page 1 in San Bernardino Sun; published on Thursday, 16 July 1936.
• • On Sunday, 17 July 1932 • •
• • Interviewed for The L.A. Times by California reporter Muriel Babcock,  Mae West told her, "The screen doesn't require as much acting of a certain type. The camera catches the slightest facial movements, the slightest twitch of an eye." The complete interview appeared in the weekend edition on Sunday, 17 July 1932.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Wonder how Mae West would look as a redhead and Kay Francis as a blonde.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "I'm going to change my tempo and work very, very fast. This picture needs a big lift to pick up the speed and wake an audience up."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • Variety mentioned Mae West.
• • When Mae West finished up in “Go West, Young Man,” for Emanuel Cohen, in 40 shooting days, the happy producer tossed a binge for the entire outfit.  . . .
• • Source: Item in Variety; published on Wednesday, 7 October 1936
• • Photo: As Mavis Arden, Mae West tries to seduce a naive country fellow (played by Randolph Scott) after her limousine breaks down during her personal appearance tour for her latest film "Drifting Lady"
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • • 
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — — 
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 13th anniversary • •  
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past thirteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,000 blog posts. Wow!  
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fourteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4003rd blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

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• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1936

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Monday, July 16, 2018

Mae West: Eben E. Rexford

MAE WEST does not appear in the opening scene of “She Done Him Wrong.”
• • The 1928 stage version begins in a Chicago jail with a long monologue by Chick Clark, the convicted jewel thief, who complains about the perfidiousness of “the dame that said she’d stick” who — — as soon as the jail gates closed behind him — — packed up her diamonds and took off for the Bowery.
• • Paramount Pictures did not want to focus on Chick Clark, who is portrayed sympathetically in the Broadway melodrama.  The studio preferred to open the motion picture by evoking nostalgia for the 1890s era of the Bowery.
• • The music used in the opening medley included old favorites such as “Frankie and Johnny,” “When You and I Were Young, Maggie,” “The Bowery;” “Daisy Bell,” "The Old Gray Mare,” and “Pop Goes the Weasel.”
• • The music used in the saloon included “She's More to Be Pitied Than Censured” [1894] written by William B. Gray and "Silver Threads Among the Gold" [1873].
• • Eben E. Rexford [16 July 1848 — 18 October 1916] • •
• • Fred Santley sang these two numbers in Gus Jordan's saloon. "Silver Threads Among the Gold" was composed by H.P. Danks and the lyrics were written by Eben E. Rexford.
• • Eben E. Rexford was born in Johnsburgh, New York on 16 July 1848.
• • Eben E. Rexford died in Green Bay, Wisconsin on 18 October 1916.  He was 68. He would be inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame, finally, in 1970.
• • On Wednesday, 16 July 1952 in Groton, Connecticut • •
• • On Wednesday, 16 July 1952 Mae West traveled to the Groton submarine base to participate in the "debut" of the scarlet red life jackets dubbed "Mae Wests" [a flotation device]. The new color was designed to be visible from greater distances; a cord attached to the jackets, when pulled, caused them to immediately inflate, getting a nod of approval as their namesake stood by for the demonstration.
• • Nope! Mae West never performed at Neir’s • •
• • Mae West never performed at Neir's — — nor did she ever set foot in this all-male bastion of sweaty factory laborers.
• • For decades, laborers went to bars to drink, relax, spit, smoke cigars, curse, discuss politics, and (most importantly) to get away from wives and women.
• • Learn more about Woodhaven, a factory hub during the brief time the West family resided there.
• • LINK: http://maewest.blogspot.com/2014/08/mae-west-born-in-bushwick.html
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • In 1935, the Los Angeles County tax man observed that John Barrymore is virtually down to his last yacht. Joan Crawford has more jewels than "Diamond Lil” Mae West. Charles Chaplin is the wealthiest movie star. Harold Lloyd is the screen's largest landholder.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "Yes, they kinda went for me."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A Roman Catholic paper mentioned Mae West.
• • The Daily Express has been so overwhelmed by the success of the American campaign that it sees in the movement a "Vatican War on Sex Films,* and declares that the Pope has sent explicit instructions to Catholic organizations in all countries to "wipe the sex film and the crime film from the screens of the world.”
• • The Express asserts that “film producers are to be given no warning. Within 24 hours, a world campaign against one Individual film can be launched. The result will be sensational.”
• • The banning by the New York State Board of Regents of the title of Mae West’s new picture is seen by the newspapers here as the first result of the League of Decency’s campaign.”  . . .
• • Source: Item in Catholic News Service - Newsfeeds; published on Monday, 16 July 1934
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • • 
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — — 
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 13th anniversary • •  
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past thirteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,000 blog posts. Wow!  
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fourteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4002nd blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml   

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1935

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West