Friday, May 27, 2016

Mae West: Alan Young Dies

MAE WEST met Alan Young [19 November 1919 — 19 May 2016] when she was invited to guest star on the popular TV series "Mister Ed," about a talking horse. Alan played Wilbur Post, the architect who owns this intelligent 4-legged creature. The CBS show ran for six seasons (1961 to 1965).
• • "Alan Young, star of 'Mr. Ed,' dies at 96" • •
• • Actor-comedian Alan Young, who played the amiable straight man to a talking horse in the 1960s sitcom “Mister Ed,” died of natural causes.  His children were around his bedside. He was 96.
• • His death occurred at the Motion Picture and Television Home, where he had been in residence for the past four years.
• • Alan Young was an English-born Canadian-American actor, voice actor, comedian, radio host, television host and personality best known for his role as Wilbur Post in the television comedy series Mister Ed and as the voice of Scrooge McDuck in Disney films, TV series and video games.  In addition to Mae West, an eclectic group of celebrities, including Clint Eastwood and baseball great Sandy Koufax, made lively guest appearances opposite the talkative horse.
• • On Monday, 27 May 1935 • •
• • It was Monday, 27 May 1935 and Mae West fans were lining up to see the screen queen in "Goin' to Town" opening its exclusive engagement at  Capitol Theatre in Ontario, Canada.
• • That week in Ontario, these feature films were onscreen: "The Bride of Frankenstein" starring Boris Karloff and "Loves of a Dictator" starring Olive Brook (at the Tivoli).
• • On Friday, 27 May 2005 • •
• • Talented artist Tom Tierney released his wonderful "Mae West Paper Doll" book on Friday, 27 May 2005.  Dover published it. You must have a copy in your collection of Westian.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • It's a film event when Mae West's leading man in "Belle of the Nineties" co-stars with the glamorous star of "Berkeley Square."
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "Keep cool and collect."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A newspaper mentioned Mae West.
• • Louis Sobol wrote:  Johnnie Ray travels backstage of the Latin Quarter to pose for a few camera shots with Mae West . . .
• • Source:  Louis Sobol's syndicated column "New York Cavalcade" rpt in Desert Sun; published on Monday, 1 November 1954
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3451st blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.


• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

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• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1954

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Mae West: Out of Romance

MAE WEST took credit for the script and dialogue of "Go West, Young Man" even though it was based on a well-regarded Broadway play by Lawrence Riley.  That is one more proof of the power the blonde bombshell had at Paramount Pictures at the height of her career.
• • Mae West is in “Go West. Young Man” at the Lincoln and at the Orpheum • •
• • The legit show “Personal Appearance,” done “right” by Mae West, comes to the movies as “Go West, Young Man.”
• • Those who may have witnessed the stage play, either by the New York City's Broadway cast or by the University Players, or have read the book on “Personal Appearance” need not back up from Mae’s version.  It’s well known that Mae uses her own gags and has the rawest wit of the screen. She can strip all the other wise-crackers of their glory and dwindle them to pint size in a very few minutes of verbal sparring and hip rhythm.
• • General trend of the story is the same. 
• • Mavis Arden is a movie star out on a string of personal appearances and is accompanied by Warren William, her press agent, whose assignment as defined by her husband [sic], head of the picture company for which she works, is to keep her out of romance with the boys along the way. Randolph Scott is a roadside filling station operator and inventor of a motion picture gadget. Lyle Talbot is a candidate for political office who sees his chances go haywire after a string of headlines proclaims his love-nesting with a married [sic] and screen famous woman. New event in the story Is a phony kidnapping finish which builds up to a gag ending — — the likes of which Mae is past mistress of manipulation.
• • Isabel Jewell, Alice Brady, Margaret Perry, a newcomer, and Elizabeth Patterson are strong in their portions.
• • Lawrence Riley [1896 — 29 November 1974] wrote the original.  But the credits say screen play and dialogue is by Mae West.
• • Source:  Article in The Lincoln Star (Lincoln, Nebraska);  published on Sunday, 6 December 1936.
• • On Sunday, 26 May 1889 • •
• • Another wedding in the Jacob Delker family; Delker was Mae's maternal grandfather.  Matilda West's brother Carl Delker married Miss Mathilde Misdorn on Sunday, 26 May 1889.
• • Earlier that year Miss Matilda Delker had wed John West in Greenpoint, Brooklyn on Saturday, 19 January 1889.
• • On Saturday, 26 May 1934 • •
• • A week-long series, titled "Roads of Romance" by Harry Lee and Winfield Meggs (illustrated with charming pen and ink drawings of Mae on page 31), was printed in The Winnipeg Evening Tribune on  Saturday, 26 May 1934 (and 5 other dates).
• • On Wednesday, 26 May 1999 • •
• • Wednesday, 26 May 1999, TV viewers and Mae mavens were able to watch  Intimate Portrait, Season 5, Episode 28: "Mae West." This was the original air date and it was shown on LIFE.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Asked if she liked clothing by Christian Dior, Mae West told a fashion reporter, "I think Dior looks good on Dior."
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "Without diamonds, honey, I'd feel undressed."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • Cinema Retro Magazine discussed the film career of Mae West.
• • Don R. Stradley looks at "Sextette," the cinematic swan song of the legendary Mae West
• • Source:  Article in Issue # 26 of Cinema Retro; published in May 2013
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3450th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.


• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

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• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1934

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Mae West: Not Mentioned

MAE WEST crossed paths with Clark Gable numerous times.  She even testified on his behalf when a British woman appeared, saying Gable (working as a tutor under a different name) had fathered her daughter.
• • In 1936, a trade publication announced:  Clark Gable and Mae West are not included in the “Who’s Who,” the American publication issued early, which lists what it considers are the important people of the United States. Clark and Mae have millions of admirers but they still are unable to be mentioned in the pages of this noted book.
• • It is good news to learn that Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, Janet Gaynor, and Nelson Eddy all figure in the precious volume.
• • On Saturday, 25 May 1912 • •
• • "Mae West — Songs" • •
• • When Mae West made her solo debut at Hammerstein's, the act was eleven minutes of dances and songs that were delivered in a Bert Williams like manner — — talking her way through.  Mae selected "Parisienne," "Dancing-Prancing," and "Rap, Rap, Rap."  Her closing number was a sultry cooch.
• • Reviewing this variety artist in their issue dated Saturday, 25 May 1912, The New York Clipper felt that a number of well-placed comrades in the audience were there, helping her along.
• • In their edition dated for Saturday, 25 May 1912, Variety's critic called her a "freak." In their opinion, Mae's presentation lacked "that touch of class that is becoming requisite nowadays for first-class houses."
• • On Wednesday, 25 May 1927 in Variety • •
• • Apparently, Texas Guinan was having difficulties with the Shuberts over her show "Padlocks of 1927."  When Variety printed an item on 25 May 1927 noting that "Mae West is being readied to jump in," their intention was probably meant to pinch some sense into the speakeasy hostess, who regularly paid for ads to promote her night spots in The New Yorker and whose spectacles attracted people from The Algonquin Round Table, an audience quite far from the circle of Mae West admirers. 
• • On Monday, 25 May 1936 • •
• • Sydney, Sunday — — Australians will not be permitted to view Mae West's latest picture, 'Klondyke Annie,' as the Federal film censorship has placed a ban on it, explained Brisbane's  Courier-Mail in an article printed on Monday, 25 May 1936.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Miss West, publicised as the "girl with the 50,000 dollars treasure chest," now holds a policy for that amount from Lloyds of London.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  “ I wrote the story myself. It's all about a girl who lost her reputation but never missed it.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A newspaper mentioned Mae West.
• • Wax Figures Startling in Likeness • •
• • May Mann wrote:  Clara Bow, with flaming tresses when she was the famous "It" girl; Mae West, when she first came out from New York to seek a movie career; . . .
• • Source:  Article by May Mann for The Deseret News; published on Saturday, 28 November  1936
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3449th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.


• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

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• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1936

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Mae West: Best Built Man

Movie star MAE WEST often appeared in the night life columns. But this item printed on Thursday, 24 May 1956 probably did not sit too well with the screen legend. Soon Jayne Mansfield would be telling the reporters she was "that way" about muscle-bound Mickey. Uh-oh.
• • EARL WILSON: Muscles Girl Muscles Man • •
• • New York — — Earl Wilson wrote:  Jayne Mansfield's new romance is with “Mr. Universe,” Hungarian Micky Hargitay, of the Mae West "muscle man” troupe who has medals acclaiming him "the best built man in the world.” They met at the Latin Quarter and, though he’s gone on to Syracuse with Mae, he phones Jayne three times a day and Jayne's agent is helping him become an actor on his own . . . soon.
• • “This could develop into something," says Jayne, whose build is equally famous; “He’s so modest," she adds, “and never says anything about his muscles. He’s really divoon [sic].”
• • Source: Earl Wilson's syndicated column rpt in Desert Sun; published on Thursday, 24 May 1956.
• • On Tuesday 24 May 1955 • •
• • William Ritt wrote:  A Hollywood columnist reveals that Mae West insisted as long as 20 years ago that she be granted television rights in her movie contract. The man at the next desk suggests Mae might now change her old slogan to read “Tune up and see me some time." This item appeared in The Daily Banner on Tuesday,  24 May 1955.
• • After Dark Magazine, May 1977 • •
• • In the late 1970s Patrick Pacheco took over the editorship of After Dark Magazine and tried to boost the iron content with more red-blooded interviews. In the May 1977 issue, Patrick Pacheco's article on Mae West was printed. The title was: "Ladies and Gentlemen — The Lady, the Lions, and Her Amazing 'Sextette'!"
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • In Boston, where Mr. Hearst's American and Sunday Advertiser shot both barrels at Mae West and the production, the Metropolitan Theatre grossed $20,000 last Saturday and Sunday, starting off to a house record.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "I was snow white but I drifted."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A newspaper mentioned Mae West.
• • "Mae West Film Banned" • •
• • "From Murderess to Army Lassie" • •
• • Sydney, Saturday — — Mae West's new picture, "Klondike Annie," has been banned by the Federal film censorship.
• • It cannot be exhibited in any Australian State. In New Zealand, however, the film was permitted to be released.  . . .
• • Source: Article: "Mae West Film Banned" in Sunday Mail (Brisbane); published on Sunday, 24 May 1936
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3448th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.


• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1936

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West