Friday, September 04, 2015

Mae West: Midget Village

Like all the top screen stars of her era, MAE WEST attended the ambitious fair known as the California Pacific International Exposition, which opened in San Diego on Wednesday, 29 May 1935.  One of the most popular attractions built for the Fairgrounds was The Hollywood Motion Picture Hall of Fame. All the fan magazines sent reporters. Editorial coverage began appearing in magazines, for their September and October issues.
• • The Midway awaits. Let's follow in the footsteps of Mae West, shall we?
• • "Getting in personal touch with favorite Fair personalities" • •
• • Tom Kennedy wrote:  While I was wondering whether I should take a look at "Life," for adults only, too, the loud speakers on the midway announced that Mae West was entering the Fairgrounds if anyone were interested — — and it seems that just about fifty million people were.  Mae arrived in a little something in white and a train (I've seen better places for trains), and when her car was stopped at the gate, she hopped a chair and told the boy — — whose face had one of those beatific there-is-a-Santa-Claus expressions — — to take her to the Motion Picture Hall of Fame. When it comes to loyalty, Mae West is right there.
• • Tom Kennedy explained:  Mae was with the faithful Timony, and two bodyguards and two Pinkerton detectives (furnished by the Fair just in case), but if you think Mae was trying to dodge her public, then you have another think coming to you.  She signed everything from autograph books to a bag of peanuts. About the thousandth autograph, Timony got a little uneasy and whispered to Mae that it was time to duck.
• • "Listen," said Mae, "these are the people who pay to see my pictures. I'm going to sign autographs as long as they want me to." And she did, despite the fact that one adoring fan ripped the sleeve out of her dress.  
• • Mae West asked to see the midgets • •
• • Tom Kennedy reported:  After she made a personal appearance at the Motion Picture Hall of Fame, Mae asked to see the midgets, so she was driven over to the Midget Village and you would have died laughing if you had seen Mae clambering into a midget house.  The furniture being too small, she had to sit on the floor with dozens of midgets gathered about her.  The midget who impersonates Mae West in the show climbed up on her lap and I overheard this  priceless bit of conversation: "Miss West," lisped the little Mae West, "I hope they write a newspaper story about us and say that you're my mother."
• • "Oh, no, oh, no," remonstrated Mae, "not that."  . . .
• • Source: Article for Screenland written by Tom Kennedy; published in the  October 1935 issue.
• • On Wednesday, 4 September 1935 in Hollywood • •
• • Joseph Breen wrote to John Hammel on Wednesday, 4 September 1935, complaining (again) about the script for "Klondike Annie" and Mae's dialogue.
• • On Friday, 4 September 1987 in California • •
• • "I'm No Angel" starring Mae West was screened on Friday, 4 September 1987.  This iconic comedy was selected for the series "Paramount Pictures: 75 Years." Mae West's director was Wesley Ruggles.  Audiences enjoyed it at the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive during Labor Day weekend. 
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • The past five years, however, have seen an explosion of critical interest in Mae West, not simply in her status as a camp-and-vamp Hollywood icon, but in her controversial work as a playwright and novelist, her experimentation with sexually and racially coded performance styles.  
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "All my pictures have made big money.  And I wouldn't take on any project unless it was right for me."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A book on musical theatre mentioned Mae West.
• • Theatre chroniclers Gerald Martin Bordman and Richard Norton wrote:   Robert Baral in his history of the genre, Revue, contends that Mae West's exaggerated mannerisms were derived from Bert Savoy's flamboyant technique and that her famous "Come up and see me sometime" [sic] reflects Savoy's "You musssst come over!" ...
• • Source: From the book "American Musical Theatre: A Chronicle" written by Gerald Martin Bordman, Richard Norton (Oxford: Oxford University Press);  published on 1 March 2010
• • Note: Bert Savoy [1888 — 1923] was an American entertainer who performed in drag
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •    
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,200 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3260th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1932

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Thursday, September 03, 2015

Mae West: Adult Education

Motion pictures starring MAE WEST were featured in Adult Education courses run by College of the Desert.  How many enrolled on Friday, 3 September 1965 for this, my little chickadee?
• • Class Offerings for Adults at College of the Desert • •
• • Classes start on September 13, 1965. Registration takes place September 9th and 10th.
• • GREAT FILM SERIES Tuesday 1:00 and 7:30 p.m. Lecture Hall.  Includes classic shorts such as "Peaches" — Harry Langdon, classic comedies such as "My Little Chickadee" — Mae West, W. C.  Fields, and  . . .
• •  Announcement (page 5) in The Desert Sun; published on Friday,  3 September 1965.
• • On Wednesday, 3 September 1930 in Variety • •
• • According to Variety, the Wall Street crash clobbered the box office. When "Sex" starring Mae West enjoyed a ten-week engagement at the Garrick Theatre in Chicago, Variety noted that The Windy City had only three other plays in production during that interval.
• • Variety's issue dated for Wednesday, 3 September 1930 noted that a dozen legitimate Chicago playhouses had gone dark.  It was a lucky break for Mae, all the same.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West was about to go to her dressing room when the director suggested that she change into a certain gown that she had worn earlier in the picture. She looked him straight in the eye and said, "I'm Mae West.  I can't wear the same clothes twice." 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "I'm not changing my screen type, either.  I might be a little sweeter character this time around, but there will still be a bad streak in me."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • The Film Daily mentioned Mae West.
• • Elizabeth Young wrote:  Mae West's novel of inter-racial sex is "The Constant Sinner" (1937; rpt. London: Virago, 1995).  . . . 
• • Source: Noted in the book "Disarming the Nation: Women's Writing and the American Civil War" written by Elizabeth Young (University of Chicago Press); published in 1999
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •    
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,200 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3259th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1926

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Wednesday, September 02, 2015

Mae West: BBC Bad Girls

MAE WEST was at the center of a "Kaleidoscope Feature" broadcast by the BBC on Friday,   2 September 1994.  Did you listen to this program?   
• • "When I'm Bad I'm Better" • •
• • Christopher Cook talks to cinema star Kathleen Turner, TV actress Julie T. Wallace, and comedian Lily Savage about Mae West and her legacy to today's bad girls.
• • Heard on BBC Radio 4 FM,  Friday, 2 September 1994.   
• • On Monday, 2 September 1911 in The Clipper • •
• • The New York Clipper (a.k.a. The Clipper) was a weekly entertainment newspaper published in New York City from 1853 to 1924.  It reviewed many forms of artistic endeavor from the circus to vaudeville to the legit.
• • Two items in The Clipper, on 3 June 1911 and on Monday, 2 September 1911, covered "A Florida Enchantment." This touring show featured "a little French adventuress" played by Mae West and "young Goldberg" played by Frank Wallace, who became her husband in April 1911. The Clipper applauded their "coon shouting."  Mae sang a number "Tiger Love," backed by a burlesque chorus and also delighted the reviewer when she made "several changes down to full tights with good effect."  Woo-woo-woo.
• • On Tuesday, 2 September 1969 • •
• • Stanley Musgrove spoke to Mae West often as she prepared for "Myra Breckinridge" and fretted about working with Michael Sarne and a much younger actress.  Musgrove's diary entries on Tuesday, 2 September 1969 reveal a different side of Mae than most of her fans knew.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • When Miss West restored her study of society to America last November, a bus-load of the Broadway nightwatch rolled out to Montclair, NJ to pay their respects to her artistry.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "I'm not looking backward at what I've done or what success has come my way. The minute you do that and stand around on what's already come your way, you're headed back in the other direction."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A book on early Hollywood footage mentioned Mae West.
• • Anthony Balducci wrote: "Hollywood on Parade A-2" [Saturday, 9 September 1933] Paramount Pictures. P: Louis Lewyn. 
• • Buster Crabbe, Mae West, Cecil B. DeMille, Lloyd Hamilton, Groucho, Chico, and Harpo Marx. 1 reel.  . . .
• • Source:  Noted in the book "Lloyd Hamilton: Poor Boy Comedian of Silent Cinema" written by Anthony Balducci (McFarland); published on Friday, 17  July 2009
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •    
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,200 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3258th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1932

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West