Thursday, May 05, 2016

Mae West: Enter a Lawyer

On Sunday, 2 May 1982, the MAE WEST bio-pic received a detailed and lengthy review by John J. O'Connor in The New York Times. This is Part 3.
• • TV View: "Ann Jillian Delivers a Fresh Portrait of Mae West" • •
• • John J. O'Connor wrote:  In private, Mama warns that it's a man's world. Mae says, ''I hate it, Mama, and you hate it, too.'' Then Mama gets to the message that will influence the rest of Mae's life: ''Don't stick yourself with one man, make your own world.'' From that point on, supposedly, Mae was never able to sustain a monogamous relationship with a man.
• • She does manage to remain surprisingly demure for several years. Her marriage to Frank Wallace, a song-and-dance man who became her vaudeville partner, seems, according to this television version of things, never to have been consummated. When a producer offers Mae a contract as a solo act, she is quite content to have Frank sent off for 40 weeks on another performing circuit. Frank is never seen again, as Mae sets about trying to develop her own act. She begins as ''The Cave Girl,'' bumping and grinding furiously for the customers.
• • A pained Rene ''Val'' Valentine, a female impersonator played coolly by Roddy McDowall, takes Mae under his protective wing. ''I want to be a star,'' she declares. ''Stars are not pieced together,'' says he, ''look inside yourself.'' Enter a successful lawyer named Jim Timony (James Brolin), who will become the one true love in her life. He, too, urges her to be ''natural'' on stage. ''If I was ever able to put the real me up there, you'd be getting me out of jail,'' Mae says prophetically. 
• • Gradually, though, ''The Cave Girl'' does begin to assume some of the characteristics of the later Mae West.  Val is impressed, but,   . . .
• • This was Part 3. Tomorrow you can read Part 4.
• • Source: TV Review by John J. O'Connor  for The  N.Y. Times; published on Sunday, 2 May  1982.
• • On Saturday, 5 May 1928 in The New Yorker • •
• • When John Huston [1906 — 1987] watched Mae West in the 1928 stage production of "Diamond Lil," the 22-year-old son of actor Walter Huston could not stop thinking about it. John saved his copy of The New Yorker [issue dated 5 May 1928] because he especially admired the illustration of a corseted, glittering, winsome Mae by the Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias. Soon after, the men collaborated on Huston's fascinating book "Frankie and Johnny."
• • On Saturday, 5 May 1934 • •
• • "Mae West Arrives" was the headline on page 11 in Queensland's Morning Bulletin on Saturday, 5 May 1934.  A host of compliments ran, like a elegant train, behind her.
• • Morning Bulletin wrote: Mae West makes you greedy. When you see "She Done Him Wrong" you want more and more of Mae. She is like the most thrilling serial story in the world. 
• • On Friday, 5 May 1972 • •
• • Roger Greenaway recorded "Ballad of Mae West (Come Up And See Me Sometime)"; composers: Macaulay, Greenaway; arranger Lew Warburton. The label was Bell in the United Kingdom.   
• • Release date of Friday, 5 May 1972 was given in booklet 'The New Singles' No. 423.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West in "Goin' to Town" established an opening day record at the Paramount. First day's receipts exceeded the previous record by $100.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "So the men rule the world and  the women rule the men — — though they don't know it."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A movie magazine mentioned Mae West.
• • "Intimate goings-on of the stars at work and play" • •
• • Frank Morley wrote: That famous sex-appeal expert, Mae West, is working under wraps, apparently, in "She Done Him Wrong," which she also wrote — but she'll find a way to take your attention away from the showgirls!  . . .
• • Source: Motion Picture; issue dated for March 1933
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3435th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.


• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1933

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Wednesday, May 04, 2016

Mae West: Messy Love Life

On Sunday, 2 May 1982, the MAE WEST bio-pic received a carefully considered review by John J. O'Connor in The New York Times. This is Part 2.
• • TV View: "Ann Jillian Delivers a Fresh Portrait of Mae West" • •
• • John J. O'Connor wrote:  In the process, the woman behind the public image emerges as a trailblazing feminist and a brave denouncer of censorship. Her detractors, however, are offered a measure of comfort in the depiction of her private love life as a mess. The wicked, presumably, will still be punished.
• • Going back to around 1900, the film spans nearly five decades in a rather awkward fashion. Miss West, played by Ann Jillian, is first seen in 1927 as the New York police are raiding a performance of ''Sex,'' a Broadway play she had written as a vehicle for herself. ''Mae, I'm afraid you'll have to come with me,'' says one of the arresting officers. ''What's there to be afraid of, honey?'' purrs Mae, showing a sudden spark of flirtatiousness. As she prepares for the subsequent trial, Mae looks in a mirror and the scene returns to her childhood. Seven-year-old Mae watches her crude father bully her long-suffering mother, who is determined that her daughter have a stage career. The impudent tot makes her vaudeville debut giving explicit directions about how the spotlight should be kept on her at all times.
• • "Mama warns that it's a man's world" • •
• • Papa is not especially enthusiastic about Mae's theatrical aspirations, and when, several years later, he discovers her necking with a young man on the family sofa, he explodes in anger. But Mama, played with saintly reserve by Piper Laurie, insists, explaining that Mae is ''different.'' In private, Mama warns that it's a man's world. Mae says, ''I hate it, Mama,  . . .
• • This was Part 2. Tomorrow you can read Part 3.
• • Source: TV Review by John J. O'Connor  for The  N.Y. Times; published on Sunday, 2 May  1982.
• • On Tuesday, 4 May 1886 • •
• • On Tuesday, 4 May 1886 the black composer Shelton Brooks was born. Mae and Beverly performed his dance novelty "Walking the Dog" when they toured with their act "Mae West and Sister." In her 1928 Bowery melodrama "Diamond Lil," Mae performed his jaunty song "Where Has My Easy Rider Gone?" and this jaunty toe-tapping number would be reprised in "She Done Him Wrong" [filmed in 1932].
• • On Saturday, 4 May 1935 • •
• • A Los Angeles Times columnist noted on Saturday, 4 May 1935, that the news about Mae West's secret marriage to Frank Wallace had "chased Hitler, the NRA, and the quintuplets off the front page of every newspaper in America for two weeks."
• • On Sunday, 4 May 1969 • •
• • Reporter Whitney Bolton wrote an article, a first person remembrance: "Critic Impressed by Mae West Role of Siren at Seance." Bolton had attended one of Mae's backstage seances and his piece was published in the Philadelphia Inquirer in its weekend edition on Sunday, 4 May 1969.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Paramount is saying that the sentence, "Come up 'n' see me some- time" — is driving the whole world mad.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "They don't have any shame! You'll never catch me in pants. I take that fashion as a personal insult!"
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A fan magazine mentioned Mae West.
• • "News and Gossip of the Studios" • •
• • Young John Cabot Lodge, the blueblood Boston lawyer who gave up his career to become a movie actor when the studios spied his Gable-ish good looks during a visit to Hollywood, may not play opposite Mae West, after all. 
• • Still, the studio is reluctant to abandon "Honky Tonk" with the two of them in the cast. The contrast between their backgrounds would make such good publicity stuff, they feel.  . . .
• • Source: Motion Picture; issue dated for February 1933
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3434th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.


• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1933

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Tuesday, May 03, 2016

Mae West: Talk of Rift

On Sunday, 2 May 1982, the MAE WEST bio-pic received this in-depth review by John J. O'Connor in The New York Times. This is Part 1.
• • TV View: "Ann Jillian Delivers a Fresh Portrait of Mae West" • •
• • John J. O'Connor  wrote:  If nothing else, television biographies are remarkable for their sheer variety. Golda Meir, as portrayed by Ingrid Bergman, is the subject of one production currently in circulation (the second half will be broadcast locally on WPIX-TV tomorrow evening at 8). In a couple of weeks, NBC will devote 10 hours to Marco Polo and his travels in the 13th century. And tonight at 9, ABC is offering ''Mae West,'' described by the network as the story of an actress ''who built her stardom on sex, yet struggled to find fulfillment with the one man she truly loved.''
• • Legend  . . .  doesn't necessarily have anything to do with truth • •  
• • The viewer is advised at the outset that the script, written by E. Arthur Kean, is ''based on events in the life of the legendary Mae West.''  Legend, of course, doesn't necessarily have anything to do with truth.  In this case, certain autobiographical facts are embellished with several of Miss West's more famous comments about life and sex (''When I'm good, I'm very good; when I'm bad, I'm better''), some of them taken out of their original performance context and delivered as passing conversation. In the process, the woman behind the public    image emerges as a trailblazing feminist and a brave denouncer of censorship.  . . .
• • This was Part 1. Tomorrow you can read Part 2.
• • Source: TV Review by John J. O'Connor  for The  N.Y. Times; published on Sunday, 2 May  1982.
• • On Thursday, 3 May 1934 • •
• • On Thursday, 3 May 1934, the headline "Mae West Scouts Talk of Rift" appeared in The Los Angeles Times. The article quotes Mae West's denial of a rift between herself and Jim Timony. The actress emphasized that they were not sweethearts, but he's still her business manager.
• • On Tuesday, 3 May 1938 • •
• • On Tuesday, 3 May 1938, the Hollywood Reporter carried coverage about the Mae West movie "Klondike Annie."
• • On Sunday, 3 May 1959 • •
• • For "The Dean Martin Show," broadcast Sunday night on 3 May 1959, his chosen guest stars were Mae West and Bob Hope.  "Dean's guest ace on May 3rd will be Mae West, normally a reluctant TV participant," said one newspaper columnist. Timex was Dean's sponsor.
• • On Tuesday, 3 May  2011 • •
• • TV lovers who tuned in at 6:30 AM on Tuesday, 3 May  2011 were treated to a re-run of "Mr. Ed." In this episode, Mr. Ed overhears Mae West commissioning Wilbur on creating ultra deluxe stables for her horses. When Ed overhears the conversation, he starts to get discontented with his own surroundings. So much fun.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • It was Mae West's folly in wearing $16,000 in diamonds — and not hiring a bodyguard. What if the robber had hit her over the head?
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "Let me have around me men — — and let it go at that."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A fan magazine mentioned Mae West.
• • "Night After Night" — George Raft attains stardom in a peppy, but otherwise commonplace gangster picture, in which George runs a speakeasy and falls in love with a society girl (Constance Cummings).  Newcomer Mae West almost steals the picture. (Paramount) . . .
• • Source: Motion Picture; issue dated for February 1933
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3433rd blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.


• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1932

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Monday, May 02, 2016

Mae West: No Shame

Motion Picture wrote:  MAE WEST looks like the only serious rival that jig-saw puzzles have yet had. When "She Done Him Wrong" opened on Broadway, with Mae in person on the same program, New Yorkers left home en masse to see her; the whole show had to be held over. Reporters (who dug up the amazing information that she was born on August 17, 1900 [sic]) rushed to interview her — — to find out what she thought about Hollywood.
• • Mae told them that Peter, the Hermit, a 70-year-old recluse, was "the only man out there that interested me." She confessed that she was surprised to be robbed of her jewels there, and surprised Hollywood by neither drinking nor smoking.
• • And what about women wearing trousers? "They don't have any shame! You'll never catch me in pants. I take that fashion as a personal insult!"
• • Source:  Item in Motion Picture; issue dated for April 1933.
• • On Sunday, 2 May 1982 • •
• • In the United States the bio-pic "Mae West" was shown on TV on Sunday, 2 May 1982. Actress Ann Jillian was cast in the title role. To announce this, Chicago TV Week Magazine put a beautiful photo of Mae on their cover; this issue was dated for May 2nd, too.
• • On Sunday, 2 May 1982 • •
• • Covering the Mae West bio-pic for The N.Y. Times, John J. O'Connor wrote: If nothing else, television biographies are remarkable for their sheer variety.  ... The viewer is advised at the outset that the script, written by E. Arthur Kean, is ''based on events in the life of the legendary Mae West.'' Legend, of course, doesn't necessarily have anything to do with truth. In this case, certain autobiographical facts are embellished with several of Miss West's more famous comments about life and sex (''When I'm good, I'm very good; when I'm bad, I'm better''), some of them taken out of their original performance context and delivered as passing conversation.   . . . Her detractors, however, are offered a measure of comfort in the depiction of her private love life as a mess. The wicked, presumably, will still be punished.  . .
• • On 2 May 2011 in People Magazine • •
• • Mae West appeared in People Magazine in their issue dated for 2 May 2011.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Billy Sunday, the evangelist, told Mae West that if she ever quit acting she would be a sensation in the pulpit.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "I think Dior looks good on Dior."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A syndicated news snip mentioned Mae West.
• • "Mae’s Marriage Worries Broadway" [United Press] • •
• • New York, April 22 — — Whether Mae West is married to Frank Wallace, or “never heard of the guy,” puzzled Broadway today. A former press agent who prefers to keep his identity concealed, snorted: “Mae’s been married, and everybody knows it.”
• • Jack Linder, who staged “Diamond Lil” for Mae West in 1928, said that Frank Wallace died about two years ago after a serious operation.  . . .
• • Source: Item rpt in Healdsburg Tribune (California); published on Monday, 22 April 1935 
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 11th anniversary • •
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past eleven years. The other day we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3432nd blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.


• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1935

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West