Monday, June 01, 2020

Mae West: Prison Diary #6

There are many myths about MAE WEST as a prisoner — — silliness such as she drove there “in a limousine” or she arrived “carrying roses” and “accompanied by her maid.” What better way to banish the B.S. baloney than invite the Brooklyn bombshell to describe this experience in her own words. This is Part 6 of 7 segments.
• • Mae West, Sunbeam, Trips from Prison • •     
• • Island's Lady Bountiful Plans a Prison Library • • 
• • Mae West’s “panty poem” to the Warden • •
• • • "I was angry when I met him,
• • • but the fault was all his own,
• • • for he gave me funny undies
• • • that scratched me to the bone.
• • • I said, "Look here, Warden,
• • • These things I cannot wear,
• • • Just feel them," and he answered,
• • • "But that's not on the square.
• • • Not that I don't want to,
• • • But, good God, I wouldn't dare!"
• • Mae West’s Plans • • . . . 
• • Note: Stage play “Courting Mae West” covers her two Prohibition Era trials in NYC. Producers can request a copy.
• • Source: N.Y. Daily News (New York, NY); published on Thursday, 28 April 1927.
• • On Tuesday, 1 June 1999 • •
• • In VHS format, the 60-minute TV movie "Intimate Portrait: Mae West" [1999] was released on Tuesday, 1 June 1999.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West chose to be an independent woman who was comfortable with her sexuality. The political climate of the times, however, saw her open sexuality as pornographic.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “The inmates were very interesting.”
• • Mae West said: "I'm often asked why I like to play seductive females. It's because virtue has its own reward, but has no sale at the box office."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • Associated Press discussed Mae West.
• • Mae West Begins Ten Day Term in Prison • •
• • Mae West, the star and the co-author of SEX, and two negresses and two white women as fellow passengers left Jefferson Market Women's Prison today for the workhouse on Welfare Island where she will serve nine days of the ten days sentence imposed yesterday for giving an obscene performance.
• • Clarence W. Morganstern, manager of the production, and James A. Timony are serving their ten day sentences at the Tombs. ...
• • Source: Associated Press, rpt in Frederick News Post (on page 1); published on Wednesday, 20 April 1927 
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,486th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
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• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • underwear in 1936 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Friday, May 29, 2020

Mae West: Prison Diary #5

There are many myths about MAE WEST as a prisoner — — silliness such as she drove there “in a limousine” or she arrived “carrying roses” and “accompanied by her maid.” What better way to banish the falsehoods than invite the Brooklyn bombshell to describe this experience in her own words. This is Part 5 of 7 segments.
• • Mae West, Sunbeam, Trips from Prison • •     
• • Island's Lady Bountiful Plans a Prison Library • • 
• • Mae West Asked for Undies • •
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: Mae West continued, "Later I worked in the library, dusting books and things, and that's where I got the idea of starting a library. I thought it wasn't much of a library they had. Of course, I’ll let a committee and the warden pick the books."
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: "No exceptions whatever were made in her case," Warden Schleth [1879— 1963] interposed, "and she didn't ask for any special favors outside of the underwear."
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: Here Miss West passed over a poem whose authorship she admitted. It read: “Mae West to Warden Schleth.”   
• • Mae West’s “panty poem” to the Warden • • . . .
• • Note: Stage play “Courting Mae West” covers her two Prohibition Era trials in NYC. Producers can request a copy.
• • Source: N.Y. Daily News (New York, NY); published on Thursday, 28 April 1927.
• • On Tuesday, 29 May 1934 in New Zealand • •
• • A flattering article on Mae West's emergence as a new screen star was published in New Zealand in the Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser (on page 2) on Tuesday, 29 May 1934. Very nice to discover it.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • "I'm No Angel" did good box office. Mae West's stock rose even higher in Tinseltown after two successes in the States.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "Anybody who needs a dirty play ought to call on Mr. Wallace for suggestions."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A NYC theatre critic discussed Mae West.
• • Mae West “Sex” Capade! • •
• • Frank Rich wrote: Politics turned a hit into a Jazz Age phenomenon. When New York’s rakish mayor, Jimmy Walker, took a Havana holiday in February 1927, the acting mayor, Joseph V. (“Holy Joe”) McKee, raided three risqué Broadway shows. Mae West was the prime target: Sex, then in the tenth month of its run, had been seen by 325,000 theatergoers. To the delight of the tabloid press, its twenty actors were hauled off to a police station in Hell’s Kitchen. The star spent the night in the Jefferson Market Women’s Prison. …
• • Source: New York Magazine; published in their 1 April 2012 issue
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,485th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • with the warden in April 1927 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Thursday, May 28, 2020

Mae West: Prison Diary #4

There are many myths about MAE WEST as a prisoner — — silliness such as she drove there “in a limousine” or she arrived “carrying roses” and “accompanied by her maid.” What better way to banish the foolish B.S. than invite the Brooklyn bombshell to describe this experience in her own words. This is Part 4 of 7 segments.
• • Mae West, Sunbeam, Trips from Prison • •     
• • Island's Lady Bountiful Plans a Prison Library • • 
• • Mae West Feels Evangelical • •
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: Mae West continued, "Several of those I met would respond to better treatment, I'm sure, and I'm arranging to get them positions when they come out in two or three months."
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: Right here both actress and warden admitted that the picture of Mae West mopping floors or working in the laundry on Welfare island was a myth.
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: Mae West did little work beyond keeping her cell clean because there isn't enough work even for the six-months-prisoners.
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: Mae West added, "I got up about 9, and I went to bed at 9," she went on, "but I didn't get to sleep till about 1. They could put me to bed, but they couldn't make me go to sleep.”
• • Mae West Asked for Undies • • . . .
• • Note: Stage play “Courting Mae West” covers her two Prohibition Era trials in NYC. Producers can request a copy.
• • Source: N.Y. Daily News (New York, NY); published on Thursday, 28 April 1927.
• • On Tuesday, 28 May 1935 • •
• • The Straits Times in Singapore carried this headline: "Mae West Marriage Claim — —   Come Up and See My Lawyer Some Time."  Uh-oh. Trouble brewing.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: From the Secret Files of Harry Pennypacker" [2008] was a novel. In one chapter, Michael Druxman, a longtime Hollywood PR agent, poked fun at the scandals the studio went mad to hush up and he has fictionalized gossip about Mae West and W.C. Fields. Amusing.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "You have to outfight everyone else to succeed."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A syndicated columnist interviewed Mae West.
• • Journalist George Lait wrote: On April 19, 1927, Mae West was sentenced to serve 10 days in the New York City work house on Welfare Island and to pay a $500 fine.
• • George Lait wrote: Warden’s Words. When Mae left Welfare Island, Warden Henry O. Schleth called newspaper reporters aside and said: “She’s a fine woman, boys. A great character.” . . .
• • Source: Syndicated content, rpt by Winona Republican Herald (Winona, MN); published on Tuesday, 12 December 1933
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,484th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • newspaper headlines in April 1927 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Mae West: Prison Diary #3

There are many myths about MAE WEST as a prisoner — — silliness such as she drove there “in a limousine” or she arrived “carrying roses” and “accompanied by her maid.” What better way to banish the moronic B.S. than invite the Brooklyn bombshell to describe this experience in her own words. This is Part 3 of 7 segments.
• • Mae West, Sunbeam, Trips from Prison • •     
• • Island's Lady Bountiful Plans a Prison Library • • 
• • Mae West had enough material, she said • •
• • Mae West added: "I got enough material for two or three plays, oh, I got plenty. The other inmates interested me very much. I went around with a matron and talked to them. I studied some of their cases. What did they say? Oh, they said plenty. But I really think something should be done for them, and I may start to do something like that. These girls go out of here with about ten cents, and what are they going to do back in the city? There's nothing for them except to carry on as lawbreakers. That's why they come back here again and again."
• • Mae West Feels Evangelical • • . . .
• • Note: Stage play “Courting Mae West” covers her two Prohibition Era trials in NYC. Producers can request a copy.
• • Source: N.Y. Daily News (New York, NY); published on Thursday, 28 April 1927.
• • On Friday, 27 May 2005 • •
• • Talented artist Tom Tierney released his wonderful "Mae West Paper Doll" book on Friday, 27 May 2005.  Dover published it. This is a must-have for Mae mavens..
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West rarely appeared on radio. When she did, she was there to promote one of her motion pictures.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “I pity weak women, good or bad, but I can't like them. A woman should be strong either in her goodness or badness."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A syndicated columnist interviewed Mae West.
• • Mae West said this to journalist George Lait: “So we talked it over, Jim Timony and I, and we decided to finance the first stage play ourselves. Jim put up a large sum of money, my mother put in some of her savings, and I put up the rest [sic]. Thus we financed [“Sex”] our first play.” . . .
• • Source: Syndicated content, rpt by Winona Republican Herald (Winona, MN); published on Tuesday, 12 December 1933
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,483rd blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • the Women's Workhouse, 1927 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Mae West: Prison Diary #2

There are many myths about MAE WEST as a prisoner — — silliness such as she drove there “in a limousine” or she arrived “carrying roses” and “accompanied by her maid.” What better way to banish the useless B.S. than invite the Brooklyn bombshell to describe this experience in her own words. This is Part 2 of 7 segments.
• • Mae West, Sunbeam, Trips from Prison • •     
• • Island's Lady Bountiful Plans a Prison Library • • 
• • Mae West had a run in her silk stockings • •
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: Only a run in the cream colored silk stockings betrayed that Mae West had been arrested, and all that sort of thing.
• • Kind Attendants • •
Mae and Warden shake hands
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: "Like it here?" Mae West shook her head. "I was surprised. I expected it to be a great deal worse. No. I wasn't worried, for I never worry about anything. But I expected to see a lot of terrible people around cops and things who would keep reminding you that they were attendants and matrons. They treat them — — not only me — — but everybody as though they were patients rather than criminals. In fact, I'm sorry I didn't get here sooner. And I don't feel as though I'd been here more than two days.”
• • Mae West had enough material for several stage plays, she said • • . . .
• • Note: Stage play “Courting Mae West” covers her two Prohibition Era trials in NYC. Producers can request a copy.
• • Source: N.Y. Daily News (New York, NY); published on Thursday, 28 April 1927.
• • On Saturday, 26 May 1934 • •
• • A week-long series, titled "Roads of Romance" by Harry Lee and Winfield Meggs (illustrated with charming pen and ink drawings of Mae West on page 31), was printed in The Winnipeg Evening Tribune on Saturday, 26 May 1934 (and 5 other dates).
• • On Sunday, 26 May 1935 • •
• • A Singapore paper announced the latest talkie starring Mae West.
• • The Straits Times wrote: The Girl with the Hour-glass figure makes every second count! 
• • Mae West in "Belle of the Nineties" — A Paramount Picture! At the Capitol Next Week.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Mae West reads trade magazines and a few newspapers. She has no taste for fiction, because she says she can write her own. 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “Virtue has its own reward, but has no sale at the box office.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A syndicated columnist interviewed Mae West.
• • Mae West said this to journalist George Lait: “My play was lurid and shocking. Clerics and clergymen denounced it, critics assailed It. But people talked about it and what is more, they struggled to pay to see it and those who saw It told their friends and they came in droves," Mae reminisces.  . . .
• • Source: Syndicated content, rpt by Winona Republican Herald (Winona, MN); published on Tuesday, 12 December 1933 
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,482nd blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • photographed at the Women's Workhouse, 1927 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Monday, May 25, 2020

Mae West: Prison Diary #1

There are many myths about MAE WEST as a prisoner — — silliness such as she drove there “in a limousine” or she arrived “carrying roses” and “accompanied by her maid.” What better way to banish the total B.S. than invite the Brooklyn bombshell to describe this experience in her own words. This is Part 1 of 7 segments.
• • Mae West, Sunbeam, Trips from Prison • •     
• • Island's Lady Bountiful Plans a Prison Library • •  
• • Reporter Elenore Kellogg wrote: Mae West, the sunbeam of the workhouse, left that institution yesterday after ten [sic] days of study and cotton stockings. Her sentence for being star and co-author of "Sex," convicted of immorality, ended at 4 p. m.
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: Before she left, Warden Henry O. Schleth described her as "a woman of wonderful character." He said the $1,000 she receives from Liberty magazine for a story of her experiences will go to found the "Mae West library" for unfortunates in the workhouse.
• • Elenore Kellogg wrote: "I'm not going to keep a nickel of it," chimed in the actress, her usual self again in black satin, blonde curls, and just a ladylike touch of mascara.
• • Mae West had a run in her silk stockings • •  . . . 
• • Note: Stage play “Courting Mae West” covers her two Prohibition Era trials in NYC. Producers can request a copy.
• • (N.Y. Daily News photo) Starry-eyed Mae West on the ferry leaving Welfare island.
• • Source: N.Y. Daily News (New York, NY); published on Thursday, 28 April 1927.
• • On Monday, 25 May 1936 • •
• • Sydney, Sunday — — Australians will not be permitted to view Mae West's latest picture, 'Klondyke Annie,' as the Federal film censorship has placed a ban on it, explained Brisbane's Courier-Mail in an article printed on Monday, 25 May 1936.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Jewelry historian Janet Zapata wrote: The actress who epitomized, or possibly caricatured, extravagance was Mae West.  Her line "Without diamonds, honey, I'd feel undressed" encapsulates the importance of jewelry to her and to the film business of the period.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: My play “Sex” was a work of art.
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A fellow inmate mentioned Mae West.
• • Mae on Welfare Island • •
• • Manhattan: About your write-ups of Mae West "doing her bit" on Welfare island, I am contradicting them. She is not doing any mopping. She is playing a piano and taking sun baths. Also, she wears silk stockings and high heeled shoes. She is working hard at writing a new play.
• • Meanwhile, I "wrote my plays" with a Workhouse mop. Too bad I was not an actress. — — EX-INMATE.
• • Source: N.Y. Daily News (New York, NY); published on Wednesday, 27 April 1927
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,481st blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • on a ferry leaving Women's Workhouse, 1927 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest

Friday, May 22, 2020

Mae West: James Brockman

Though most vaudevillians honed an act and toured with it for years, MAE WEST was always seeking new material. Moreover, she liked singing about rough and tumble types such as a grizzly bear and a cave man.
• • Kendis and Brockman wrote "I Want a Cave Man . . .,” a novelty number that Mae really grooved to.
• • In 1919, James Kendis [1883 — 1946] and James Brockman [1878 — 1967] were located at 145 West 45th Street in New York when they released this song.
• • James Brockman was born on Sunday, 8 December 1878.
• • Some sources have said he was born in Russia, then emigrated to New York. Supposedly, his birth name was Jacob Brachman.  Since it was often mis-pronounced, he Americanized it to “James Brockman.” 
• • The full title of the song Mae West included in her routines for four years (from 1919—1923) was "I Want a Cave Man Like William Hart — — The Movie Star" [words and music by James Kendis and James Brockman; arrangement by Freda Applebaum; published and copyrighted in June 1919]. Though "I Want a Cave Man" is a number ostensibly about Bill Hart, a Western film star, the lyrics reveal very little association with Hart except the fact that a title like this would capitalize on his famous name.
• • James Brockman successfully composed music for the film industry. He died in Santa Monica, California in May — — on Monday, 22 May 1967. He was 88 years old.
• • On Friday, 22 May 1936 • •
• • Graham Greene reviewed "Klondike Annie" for London's publication The Spectator, printed on Friday, 22 May 1936.
• • Unlike so many critics, Greene praised Mae's satire on the revivalists, astutely noting that "it never occurred to me that Miss West's conversion was to be taken seriously." He wrote: "I am completely uncritical of Mae West. I enjoy every one of her films . . . ."
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Owen Moore is back from New York to play with Mae West in her first Paramount starring vehicle, "Ruby Red." He is abandoning a personal appearance tour which started in Hollywood last April and which has taken him through the South and East. 
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "Too many women make the mistake of waking up some morning and saying, 'I am no longer attractive to men.'  That does it, brother, from then on they're not!"
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • Billboard mentioned Mae West.
• • “Mae West to Invade Atlantic City” • •
• • NEW YORK. Aug. 8. — — Mae West's new one, “The Constant Sinner,” is set to open in Atlantic City on August 24, with Mae in the lead. Now rehearsing under direction of Lawrence Marston. The much fought-over play “Daughter of Diamond Lil” seems to have been dropped.
• • Show is Shubert backed.
• • Those contracts that Equity has received have been signed by Joe Gaites. No bond as yet posted.
• • Source: Billboard; published on Saturday, 15 August 1931
• • The evolution of 2 Mae West plays that keep her memory alive • •
• • A discussion with Mae West playwright LindaAnn LoSchiavo — —
• • http://lideamagazine.com/renaissance-woman-new-york-city-interview-lindaann-loschiavo/
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 15th anniversary • • 
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past fifteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 4,400 blog posts. Wow! 
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started fifteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 4,480th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________
Source: https://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xml  
• • Be sure to bookmark or follow The Mae West Blog
• • Photo: • • Mae West • • sketch in 1933 • •
• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest